Tagged Data gathering

Four reasons to close down the police’s domestic extremism unit

NDEDIU-001

Join the discussion online using the hashtags #DomesticExtremist and #ShutNDEDIU

Today is Domestic Extremist Awareness Day, an annual event launched by Netpol in 2014 to publicise how the label of ‘domestic extremist’ is increasingly applied by police to anyone involved in political dissent.

This year, we are calling for the closure of the National Domestic Extremism & Disorder Intelligence Unit (NDEDIU), the discredited police unit responsible for surveillance on protesters. We are also asking you to share why you think the NDEDIU should shut down.

Here are four reasons we think are important – share yours using the hashtags #DomesticExtremist and #ShutNDEDIU on Twitter and Facebook. Read more

At war: the rise of militarised policing

Festival of Repressive Policing 2016

This article first appeared on the Red Pepper website

Police chiefs are fond of talking about the way UK law enforcement is guided by a bedrock principle of “policing by consent”: the idea that police officers are legitimised by a consensus of support in the communities where they exercise their powers.

Whether this has ever been true is another matter. Over the last four decades, there have been many in working class mining villages, in black and Asian communities, amongst numerous protest movements and in the north of Ireland who would profoundly disagree. Nevertheless, it is a comforting and prevailing fiction – even if it is hard to reconcile with the fact the police in this country are apparently in a permanent state of war. Read more

Domestic Extremist Awareness Day 2016 – shut down the NDEDIU

New Scotland Yard NDEDIU

On 5 February, the third annual #DomesticExtremist Awareness Day is calling for the closure of the discredited police unit responsible for surveillance on political dissent.

 If you are an anti-fracking campaigner, you may have been branded a domestic extremist by a Prevent anti-radicalisation workshop, or identified as one when stopped unexpectedly at a UK airport. A whistle-blower has revealed police were so desperate to stop a Green Party peer from discovering the extent of their labelling of her as one that they improperly destroyed files she had asked for.

The police, it seems, remain obsessed with finding so-called ‘domestic extremists’ amongst campaigners and activists. In spite of the launch of a public inquiry into the activities of undercover police officers, however, there remains little real scrutiny of the Metropolitan Police’s National Domestic Extremism and Disorder Intelligence Unit (NDEDIU). Read more

Netpol’s submission to Joint Committee on the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill

Just before Christmas, Netpol made a submission to Joint Committee on the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill, which is examining the government’s proposed changes to legislation on the interception and retention of communications data and bulk personal datasets by the police and the security and intelligence agencies

UPDATED: 12 February 2016: on the issue of thematic warrants – the use of targeted interception against groups of people who share a common purpose – the Joint Committee has acknowledged in its report [pdf_icon, 3.4 Mb] that:

“Witnesses expressed concerns about the contexts in which these powers could be deployed. The Network for Police Monitoring highlighted the possibility that “in the context of protest policing, this extends the use of surveillance activities to any individual associated with a protest groups… Not only does the surveillance extend to individuals themselves engaging in (possibly low-level) criminal activity, it arbitrarily extends it to all individuals believed to share a ‘common purpose’ with them.”

The Committee goes on to call, in Recommendation 38, for an amendment to the the language of the Bill “so that targeted interception and targeted equipment interference warrants cannot be used as a way to issue thematic warrants concerning a very large number of people”.

Much of the opposition to the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill has rightly focused on requirements for internet providers to store records of websites visited for up to a year and on powers for the security services and police to hack into and bug computers and phones. Both already have a sorry track record of repeatedly abusing wide-reaching surveillance powers. Our submission sets out to tackle the impact on protest and looks specifically at one issue that we have raised before: how easy it is to use powers intended for ‘serious’ criminality against far more minor illegal actions that are almost overwhelmingly peaceful. Read more

Activists can help European case against protest surveillance

PHOTO: Matt Brown on Flickr

PHOTO: Matt Brown on Flickr

Can you help us challenge the domestic extremism database?

In March 2015, the Supreme Court ruled that the gathering and retention of Brighton campaigner John Catt’s personal data by police, while he took part in protests, was lawful. Mr Catt has now lodged an application in the European Court of Human Rights, seeking a ruling that by monitoring and retaining information about people’s lawful political activities the UK is violating the privacy rights of its citizens. Read more

Resisting surveillance – even at St Pancras International

Protesters in London at Eurostar solidarity protests. PHOT: indyrikki

Protesters kettled at London Eurostar solidarity action. PHOTO: indyrikki

It remains unlawful for police to require identification and submission to filming as a condition for release from a kettle

The decision by British Transport Police (BTP) to use Railway Byelaws [pdf_icon, 174 kB] to obtain personal details from people taking part in recent Calais solidarity action does not change the basic advice to protesters – you do not have to consent to having your photograph taken or comply with demands to provide your name and address as a condition of release from a kettle.

The principle that the police have no powers to force people to give their details, or comply with police filming and photography, simply because they are held in a kettle, is contained in the High Court ruling on the Mengesha case in 2013. Lord Justice Moses made it clear that “it was not lawful for the police to maintain the containment for the purposes of obtaining identification, whether by questioning or by filming. It follows that it was not lawful to require identification to be given and submission to filming as the price for release.” Read more

Students – protect your privacy on the Free Education demo

Intelligence gathering at Gaza protest

Intelligence gathering at London Gaza protest in 2014 | PHOTO: Netpol

If you are planning to attend this November’s national student march, you should start planning now to cover up against intrusive surveillance

On Wednesday 4 November, students from around the country will assembly in London for the ‘Free Education & Living Grants For All’ protest called by the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts. Coming almost five years to the day since the start of a wave of student unrest began in London, marchers will find themselves joined by an array of police intelligence-gatherers. The demonstration is liable to face an intense level of surveillance.

As well as demanding living grants for all and an education system that is free, this is also an opportunity for student protesters to take an important stand to protect their individual privacy while out on the streets and exercising their freedom of assembly. One of the few remaining ways to do so in the current climate of mass surveillance is by covering your face with a mask or scarf and ensuring that in future, this becomes as normal on every protest as carrying a placard. Read more

Netpol calls for activists to participate in public inquiry into undercover policing

new-scotland-yard

If you have been spied on by undercover police, Netpol recommends contacting the Undercover Research Group, who are offering a way for activists to give their testimony to the forthcoming Pitchford Inquiry.

Over the next two to three years, judge Christopher Pitchford is chairing a public inquiry into undercover policing operations conducted by English and Welsh police forces since 1968. The inquiry is focusing on, but not limited to, two political policing units: the Metropolitan Police’s Special Demonstration Squad (SDS), which operated in London from 1968 to 2008, and the National Public Order Intelligence Unit (NPOIU), set up in 1999 and conducting nationwide undercover operations until it was taken over by the Met in 2010. The NPOIU was the unit that undercover officers like Mark Kennedy, Marco Jacobs and Lynn Watson belonged to. Read more

#PrivacyBloc – where do we go from here?

P1080742

Nobody should expect to give up their right to privacy, just so they can exercise their rights to freedom of expression and assembly

Netpol’s ‘Privacy Bloc‘ made quite an impact at the People’s Assembly anti-austerity demonstration in London on Saturday 20 June. We distributed around 850 face coverings and – even in a march of thousands – images of masked protesters appeared in much of the media coverage. We are delighted with how well received the masks were received on the march itself, from people from different backgrounds and all ages. It was clear we could easily have handed out many more – an indicator that people are already starting to consider the need to protect their privacy and anonymity on the streets.

So, having kick-started the debate on the need for protest anonymity, where do we go from here?

Read more